Books for Days: My August Reading List

Sunday Spotlight

A quick update: I met my reading goals last month! Every book in my July reading list was crossed off, with a day to spare (which gave me a good head start for August).

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You can find my book reviews here, with another one coming out next week for Magda Szabó's The Door:

I Paint My Reality by Frida Kahlo
The Botany of Desire 
by Michael Pollan
The Ministry of Utmost Happiness
 by Arundhati Roy
Gagamba: A Novel by F. Sionil José

I usually read 4-5 books a month, giving myself a week to finish each one. But my #FinestFiction reading challenge has actually challenged me to change it up a bit, so that I can meet my goal of reading all of the books longlisted for the 2017 Man Booker Prize by October.

And I'm off to a great start! I've already finished two on my list, and I'm slowly making my way through two new ones. Two of the books on the list are actually advanced reader copies, and I'm so delighted that I got the chance to read and review them. I also started using Book of the Month, which lets me buy copies at a much cheaper price.

I'm doubling my reading efforts this month, and already I feel a slight tinge of anxiety because I know I'm on a schedule. So how do I manage to read up? The biggest thing is cutting up screen time. If there is any indication of how I should find more time to read, the previous week was a successful trial.

In a day, I managed to find about 2-3 hours of reading time — on my breaks at work, when I'm moving my car (which is every two hours), after dinner, before bed. On days when I'm not in meetings, you can usually find me curled up on the couch, with a book in hand and a cup of tea in the other.

On Tuesday last week, I finished Mohsin Hamid's Exit West on my lunch break. It felt so disorienting to be immersed in the life of the main characters of the book, this couple who fled their homeland, and know so many intimate details about them while I slowly walked back to my desk.

I also noticed how a thread of connection in each title coarses through what I read: the edition of The Door I have is written with a preface by Ali Smith, whose book I'm getting ready to read in a couple of weeks. Doors were also a common theme in Exit West, as I stared at many, many entryways in my physical realm.

With each book I finish, my world gets bigger. And I am humbled by the fact that the more I learn, the less I know. I let it all sink in. I like to think that there are many, many rooms within my body, where each of the most memorable characters I've read live. Emerence from The Door lives somewhere in my chest, Anjum from The Ministry of Utmost Happiness behind a door in my left shoulder.

Here are this month's titles:

Exit West by Mohsin Hamid (Amazon | Indiebound)
Hunger: A Memoir of (My) Body by Roxane Gay (Amazon | Indiebound)
The Fix by Jonathan Tepperman (Amazon | Indiebound)
How to Find Love in a Bookshop by Veronica Henry (Amazon |Indiebound)
Tuwing Ikatlong Sabado (Every Third Saturday) by Words Anonymous, edited by Juan Miguel Severo (Goodreads)
Autumn by Ali Smith (Amazon | Indiebound)
Lincoln in the Bardo by George Saunders (Amazon | Indiebound)
History of Wolves by Emily Fridlund (Amazon | Indiebound)

If you've read or are currently reading any of these titles, let me know in the comments below. Happy reading!

#FinestFiction: Reading the 2017 Man Booker Longlist

Fiction, Sunday Spotlight

Since the 2017 Man Booker Prize longlist came out, I’ve been stewing on this thought: so many books, so little time. After my pseudo-dramatic rant on Friday, and after perusing the aisles and shelves of Green Apple Books & Music in San Francisco, I made my decision: this summer, I’ll be reading all of the books on the longlist. 

What is the Man Booker Prize? Here’s a little history:

From the very beginning of what was originally called the Booker Prize there was just one criterion – the prize would be for “the best novel in the opinion of the judges”. And 45 years later that is still a key sentence in the rules.

‘It is a measure of the quality of the original drafting that the main ambitions of the prize have not changed. The aim was to increase the reading of quality fiction and to attract “the intelligent general audience”. The press release announcing the prize elaborated on this: “The real success will be a significant increase in the sales of the winning book… that will to some extent be shared not only by the authors who have been shortlisted, but, in the long run, by authors all over the country.”

Since I started this blog last year, I’ve become more aware of the literary industry in different aspects. Recognition like the Man Booker Prize, Pulitzer and National Book Awards have helped me decide which books to read, and which books to pay attention to. In an ocean of titles, a lone sailor needs all the help she can get.

In addition to classics that I haven’t read, I look to these key events throughout the year to give me an idea of what  to read next along with book club recommendations (thank you, Oprah!) and national bookseller lists (thank you Michiko Kakutani and Pamela Paul!).

Once the winner is announced, oftentimes I find myself wishing I could identify with the judges’ call — whether I agree with their choice or vehemently oppose it. Last year, I attempted to read the shortlist for the National Book Award but only got to two out of five. I had run of time, and my TBR list was overflowing.

So what books will these be? Here’s a quick video:

2017 Man Booker Prize Longlist: 

4 3 2 1 by Paul Auster (US) (Faber & Faber)
Days Without End by Sebastian Barry (Ireland) (Faber & Faber)
History of Wolves by Emily Fridlund (US) (Weidenfeld & Nicolson)
Exit West by Mohsin Hamid (Pakistan-UK) (Hamish Hamilton)
Solar Bones by Mike McCormack (Ireland) (Canongate)
Reservoir 13 by Jon McGregor (UK) (4th Estate)
Elmet by Fiona Mozley (UK) (JM Originals)
The Ministry Of Utmost Happiness by Arundhati Roy (India) (Hamish Hamilton)
Lincoln in the Bardo by George Saunders (US) (Bloomsbury)
Home Fire by Kamila Shamsie (UK-Pakistan) (Bloomsbury)
Autumn by Ali Smith (UK) (Hamish Hamilton)
Swing Time by Zadie Smith (UK) (Hamish Hamilton)
The Underground Railroad by Colson Whitehead (US) (Fleet)

Called the #FinestFiction, I’m happy to say that I’ve read three of the books on the list (links to the book reviews above). That means I have ten books left, and I’m gearing up to read Exit West by Mohsin Hamid next after finishing Magda Szabó’s The Door. Last year’s winner was Paul Beatty’s The Sellout which I also reviewed on the blog. With about a month and half before the shortlist comes out and two months and a half until the announcement of the prize winner, I’m thrilled to discover what the judges have seen in these titles.

baroness20lola20young2c20201720man20booker20prize20chair20of20judges20-20credit20janie20airey2028329_3“Only when we’d finally selected our 13 novels did we fully realise the huge energy, imagination and variety in them as a group.  The longlist showcases a diverse spectrum — not only of voices and literary styles but of protagonists too, in their culture, age and gender.  Nevertheless we found there was a spirit common to all these novels: though their subject matter might be turbulent, their power and range were life-affirming – a tonic for our times.”

–Baroness Lola Young,
Chair of the 2017 Man Booker Prize judges

Hope you can join me in this challenge by reading one, two, three or all of them!